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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
here it a great american venue so let's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington, d.c.. a huge amount of people gather on the washington mall. in 2009 and was all the way from the capitol all the way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. they are there for the inauguration. people gather to watch and other places as well. in times square in the new york city and classrooms around the country in paris and iraq and afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there and there is a big crowd on the mall. i'm going to speak to you today about this great historic subject come of this institution and i am not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 12:00pm EST
will come here to washington and ask us to help them out from their bad decisions. i hope at that time that we can show by pointing at these states and these right ideas that we know the solutions at the state level and that we also know that we can change how we think here at the federal level and make our country work a lot better. i i leave here with a lot of respect for my colleagues. i know my democrat colleagues believe with conviction their ideas. and i know my republican colleagues do too. but i hope we can look at the facts. i hope we can look at the real world. i hope we can look at what's working and set aside the politics and realize what really makes this country great and strong is when we move dollars and decisions out of washington back to people and communities and to states, that it works. not for 2% but for 100% of americans. i feel like our customers in the senate, at the heritage foundation, or wherever we go, are 100% of americans who these ideas can work for to build a better future and a stronger america. and i'm not leaving the fight. i hope to raise my game at
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
in washington and guess who was there? iran led. he heard plays speech in lexington because he was visiting the town on his way from springfield to washington d.c., visiting the family in lexington. while he was there he got to hearing in replace speech. this was a tremendous thing for abraham lincoln. he always idolized like, calling him his bell ideal of a politician and to have the opportunity to hear him speak must've been a huge thing for him. lincoln, when he was young, carry around a book of clay's speeches it used to read into of self, and when he was a young man and legislator he would be president of the classic club and ask henry clay to come speak in springfield. this is really like is opportunity to meet the politician he respects and admires the most and he heard him give a speech against the war. perhaps it is a surprising that when lincoln gets to washington, instead of talking about tariffs or any of the economic issues that have really motivated as a politician, he decides to oppose the war. the first speech that lincoln gives in congress is what is known as his bought res
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:45am EST
the military option. shriver opposed this reordering of priorities, generating the observation in washington and elsewhere, quote: like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 and 1968 one-third of america's poor moved upward out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities led shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in stormy chicago, shriver's name again came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on a flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family, still grieving from the recent death of robert, raised an objection in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success in repairing the alliance with france weakened birdies agreement about the vietnam -- by disagreement about the vietnam war, had prompted president pix son to retain him -- nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when democratic nominee george mcgove
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 9:00am EST
between washington, d.c. and new york prefer to take the train. it's not because that is always cheaper. because the service is not. it's because of the time savings and convenience. >> mr. boardman, for the northeast corridor, 80% of the population lives within 25 miles of the northeast corridor making the rail very, very accessible. how would you compare that with california? >> depends on the part of california. one of the things i can answer is, congressman, is that the air rail service between san diego and l.a. is entirely real because it just doesn't work the way that that has, as close as the arts which have and the way that it operates. but when you get to something like l.a. to san francisco you really only have the coast starlight. so there's a sufficient amount of data that would really tell you what really happened here. so from that regard, the old drink am anna karenina right now what they called it, i guess it was the coast daylight, was the primary way they moved up until 15 years ago between san francisco and l.a., and it was probably the most profitable of the private
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 12:00pm EST
carried that message straight to washington. i remember scott telling me in our very first meeting that i couldn't count on his vote. that i'd have to earn it. i told him could do whatever he pleased and while he hasn't been here long, he certainly made his mark. i've seen a lot of politicians in my day, but few if any have been as talented as scott brown. he is a unique talent. and i have no doubt we'll see him back in washington someday in the not-too-distant future. the truth is scott's victory wasn't the first time he'd done what others thought impossible. as a young man, he knew poverty first hand, and a broken home. and even took to shoplifting to feed himself and his sister. yet scott overcame these early challenges and as is often the case, he owes a lot of it to an adult who saw his potential early on. in scott's case, that adult was judge samuel zall. when scott showed up in his chambers one day, the judge saw a troubled but decent young man who needed a friendly nudge. we had a long talk about the talent i thought he had, and i didn't want to see him squander it, judge zall lat
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
pretty much fulfilled george washington's third term in national security matters. >> finally, how did the middle-class figure into your thesis? >> while the middle-class figures then, and they are the ones that got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president. the republicans mainly were running congress when we have rings like nafta, china's most favored nation status, the wto, the world trade organization. all these trade deals -- trade deals that people believed were going to bring jobs to the united states, and in every case the jobs left. >> in now on booktv, the history of united states in 1862. is the second year the civil war and specifically reactions of president abraham lincoln. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> the thank you very much. a wonderful crowd. thank you to regnery books, a real asset to our community here. with all these programs. i am glad to see my kids in the audience, who asked me to mention their names. henry, alice, abby, claire and my wife karen is here and my mother doris and many friends but also the basis as well. than
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
clay's speech, the 30th congress convened in washington. guess who was there? abraham lincoln. he heard clay speech in lexington because he was visiting the town on his way from springfield to washington dc. he was visiting his wife's family in lexington. and this was a tremendous thing for abraham lincoln. lincoln had always idolized clay. he called him his ideal politician, and to have the opportunity to actually hear him speak was a huge thing for him. when lincoln was young, he carried around a book of clay's speech is. and when he was a young man and a legislator, he asked henry clay to come speak in springfield, and clay didn't come. this was his opportunity to meet the politician that he respected and admired the most. and he heard clay and his speech against the war. perhaps it isn't surprising that when he gets to washington, instead of talking about terrorists or any of the economic issues, that motivated him as a politician. and he decides to oppose the war. what are known as spot resolutions. so he gets up and called the president a liar for claiming that american blood was
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30am EST
'm a small business owner from washington state, and this campaign does not have our best interests at heart. we need to fix the economy before the debt, you know, because i need customers. i don't need corporate -- [inaudible] trying to steal my medicare money. >> all right. i look forward to visiting afterwards for all of our ohio constituents who are here. where was i? so, thank you. but i do appreciate the opportunity to talk for a moment about tax reform -- >> senator portman, i'd like to make it clear that senior citizens are not -- [inaudible] we cannot -- [inaudible] >> um, as you can see, there's a lot of strong opinions on how we deal with our record deficits and debts, but i think everybody here and certainly the folks i talk to back home agree we have to. and these decisions won't be easy. as maya said, the political process is such that it's controversial, and we're going to hear plenty of opinions, it sounds like, from our panelists just as we have from the audience. >> i want to know what you're going to do to make sure the middle class -- >> let him speak! >> boo! >> middle c
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:00am EST
speech, 30s congress convened in washington against tuesday or, abraham lincoln. abraham lincoln hurt clay speech amok and because he was visiting the town on its way from springfield to washington d.c., visiting mary family in lexington and while he was there can be cut to your henry clay's peak. this is a tremendous thing for lincoln. lincoln had idolized clay. he caught is though ideal of a politician and to have the opportunity to hear clay speak must've been a huge thing for him. when lincoln was young, he carried around a book of clay speeches in history than to himself. when he was a young man and the legislature in springfield community president of the clay club and asked him to speak in springfield and clay didn't comes, so this is lincoln's opportunity to to meet the politician he respects and admires the most to be hurt clay gives a speech against the war. so perhaps it isn't surprising that the blanket gets to washington instead of talking about terrorists or economic issues that motivated him as a politician come he decides to oppose the war. the first speech lincoln get
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 8:00pm EST
diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. you know, in washington where too often we see recommendations of blue ribbon panels ignored, delayed, or deferred as they were for a long time even on the 9/11 commission, i think the secretary's swift action underscores how determined she is to apply the lessons of benghazi. clearly, mistakes were made, and we see -- we learned of those yesterday and in very stark terms about the mistakes leading up to the attack. the report makes that very clerks and one of the most candid and important observations was the failure by certain leaders to see the forest through the trees. there were clear warning signs that security situation in libya deteriorated, and going forward, it is important, and i think it's important for all of us to think in terms of going forward, that we need to do better jobs of ensuring a free and open dialogue among ambassadors, their security personnel, and officials in washington where decisions on security staffing levels and funding are made. now, as we draw the lessons, i want to be crystal clear about something else. congre
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 12:00pm EST
think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of south carolina is you've lost a great, strong, conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity and -- and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and d
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 9:00am EST
program of this kind. passenger rail and our states of oregon and washington has been in place since 1994 where we have partnered from the state level with amtrak, and in our state, burlington northern santa fe, in a collaborative approach to an incremental delivery of high and higher speed rail programs and service. so as we've been investing over the years, we see the implementation in the creation of a national vision as a very important part of what we are trying to deliver. we have a 460-mile corridor between eugene, oregon, and vancouver, british columbia. we have achieved in the last year up to 850 passengers, 50,000 passengers, and our growth is increasing year over year in the 10% rate. we have in our state invested over $480 million in capital and operations in amtrak cascades, which is what we call our program. but it wasn't until the recovery act came that we're able to make significant capital infrastructure improvements on the rail itself. sightings, double tracking, positive train control, all those amenities that will benefit high and higher speed rail, and more frequent s
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 11:00pm EST
that will allow us to realize that over the next number of years. >> christina with the washington times, thank you for coming to speak with us. u.s. officials have said several days moved up into the region, talked about why we send ships to the region, and, also, the number one concern with north korea's planned missile launch, whether they are violating u.n., you know, international regulations or whether we're worried that they could reach a missile to reach the u.s.. what's the number one concern with that, and why are we moving ships to the region? >> the moving the ships would be today moving them today or in the long run? >> today -- this week. >> oh, okay. well, we moved ships around the region all the time. we have a fairly robust deployed naval force that's actually, you know, stationed in that part of the world. we do move them around for exercises, move them around for contingencies, and in this case, you know, should seem logical we'll move them around to have the best situational awareness that we have, and to the drug that those ships are capable of participating in ballistic mi
CSPAN
Dec 12, 2012 9:00am EST
: washington d.c., december 12, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president, following leader remarks the senate will be in a period of morning business until 2:00 today. the republicans will control the first 30 minutes and the majority the final 30 minutes. the time from 11:30 till 2:00 p.m. will be for remarks by retiring senators. following morning business we'll resume consideration of the motion to proceed to s. 3637, the tag extension legislation. the filing deadline for first-degree amendments to that legislation is 1:00 p.m. today. madam president, the headline news for the last many weeks has been the fiscal cliff. in speaking with the president six months before the election, a few weeks before the election, a few days before the election and immediately after the election, he indicated that we needed to get our
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 5:00pm EST
of the world. dan, my dear friend and colleague, you will be missed in washington as much as you will be missed in hawaii. rest in peace. god bless you and your spirit. mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from north carolina. mrs. hagan: i ask unanimous consent the help committee be discharged from further consideration of s. 3472 and the senate proceed to its immediate consideration. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: s. 3472, a bill to amend the family educational rights and privacy act of 1974, to provide improvements to such act. the presiding officer: without objection. the committee is discharged. the senate will proceed to the measure. mrs. hagan: i further ask that the landrieu substitute amendment which is at the desk be agreed to, the bill as amended be read a third time and passed, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, with no intervening action or debate, and that any statements relating to the measure be printed at the appropriate place in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 6:00pm EST
, families are making tough choices about how to make ends meet. it's time for us in washington to do the same. here in the senate, it seems to me that we're always fighting about something. that might not change any time soon, but more often than not, i believe that we can raise to the common ground of great national purpose and i believe with all of my heart that this is one of those times. thank you, mr. president. and i yield the floor. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. durbin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the assistant majority leader is recognized. mr. durbin: ask consent the quorum call be lifted. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: mr. president, i rise with the intention of asking consent for the immediate passage of s. 215, the increasing american jobs through greater exports to africa act, legislation i've introduce in the senate with senators boozman, coons, cardin and landrieu, and that is being sponsored and led in the house of representatives by congressman chris smith and
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 6:00am EST
people own, have an interest in 600 miles of track between washington d.c. our nation's capital, philadelphia, new york city, boston, the most congested corridor in the united states of america, that is the only 600 miles that we really own. we another small stretches around the commuter -- all the rest of amtrak service, over 20,000 miles of private freight rail. i see the main rail people in the audience and they have concerns too about using theirs and not having dedicated them and we need to address that issue as we move forward. final point is northeast quarter is where we should be putting the focus. give the administration credit for at least taking the money that has been turned back dedicating so that to the northeast quarter but we are doing it in a piecemeal, half baked fashion. the northeast corridor, every state, every major area can benefit by bringing high-speed rail to the northeast corridor. 70% of our air traffic delays emanate from the northeast corridor even when we have next-generation air traffic control, move planes faster and closer together with doubling
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 5:00pm EST
in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel. i spent the entire night last night time to think of a way to do this and entertaining and humorous way. there is no such a way. this is about weapons of mass destruction in the middle east. it is a serious topic, and we have very serious experts. people who are the leading rights in non-proliferation. joe had the privilege of spending a year working with in a project on the lease nonproliferation, and we're going to have a very detailed report that we will be issuing in january. well over 100 pages already. very specific recommendations on how to deal with this grave threat. we have talked about the iranian nuclear program, the pursuit of nuclear weapons, the implications to the ad states, israel, our allies, the possi
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 8:30pm EST
plus, your e-mails, phone calls and tweets. washington journal, live tuesday, at 7:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span. >> now, latinos and the 2012 election, and what policy issues influenced their vote. speakers included former white house adviser to latin american, soto, and alfonso aguilar.: this is about two hours. [inaudible conversations] s. >> this is i think, as you all know, a place where public policy and research meet. i bring together the world of ideas with the world of policy action. very happy that tim johnson, the director of the latin american program is here this morning. and also want to acknowledge sal low star who had a lot to do with the planning, and this is an event we're cosponsoring with immigration works, to tamar a jacoby, and arizona state university, working on the issues. i want to acknowledge cardenas, a former governor and distinguished mexican colleague and many other good friends. and mane others back at the woodrow wilson system. and dan, who is out of government and into this civilian life. there's no doubt the latino vote was important in this past ele
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 5:00pm EST
to washington, and the senate starts to debate the ratification of this and the only nature of the obstacle arises jefferson himself lead him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire a territory. and he starts to hem and haw say we need a constitutional amendment to give the government the power. napoleon back in france had overthrown the government. he was not exactly -- >> host: constitution nap. >> guest: yeah. not repressed by the argument. he started make noises saying i'm going revoke the treaty. madison, our baseline alternative comes to jefferson. -- >> host: the secretary of state. >> guest: right. closest friend. secretary of state in the room for every negotiation. he said you can't do this anymore. you have to agree and yield it's too big an turn to let your sphrict view. he agrees and he back down. they make purchase. jefferson displays a great deal of skill. the negotiation he choose monroe, absolutely the right person. he gets through the senate, successfully, manages all the things. so he displays flexibility, but think about flexible because
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 11:00pm EST
for the disabled. >> and tomorrow morning's "washington journal", peter welch, on the latest development of the fiscal cliff negotiation. after that, joe shaw looks at the estate tax, which is set to go up the end of the year plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. now come in a discussion of how the military and national security might be a affected by spending cuts at the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, mike mike mullen, was joined at how services committee. this is a less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is peter peterson. i would like to give you a review of why we are supporting this project today. starting about 30 years ago, after studying the profound demographic trends, on the vast and unfunded promise we have made. i have decided was not unsustainable, but a primary threat to the future. speaking of unsustainable, in the nixon white house in which i served, the chairman of the council, if something is unsustainable,
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 12:00pm EST
discussion today. i don't know that we've come to any conclusion, but that makes us fit right into washington on this topic. so we thank you all for coming. before you leave, i want to do a shameless plug for a new timeline, video timeline that is going to be posted today on our kaiser family foundation web site. it's sort of a fun, quick way to get a little bit of history on medicare. so for those of you who are looking for a fun way to learn about the program, i think you would find it educational, and it's short and brief. and i know everybody likes that. so i want to thank ed for hosting this discussion today and thank our panelists for coming and sharing your thoughts on this perspective, and i leave it to ed for any final comments. >> only one thing. two things, actually. one is to fill out those evaluations and, second, to manifest what tricia was talking about by joining me in thanking our panel for this great discussion today. [applause] and for doing so well, we're going to free you from the obligation to come to any more alliance seminars this year. [laughter] >> happy new year. >>
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 12:00pm EST
the details of every troop movement in afghanistan any more than americans expected george washington to publish his strategy for the battle of york town. by the same token, american citizens recognized that their government may sometimes rely on secret intelligence collection methods in order to ensure national security, ensure public safety, and they recognize that these methods often are more effective when the details, what are really the operations and methods as we characterize them under intelligence principles, remain secret. but while americans recognize that government agencies will sometimes rely on secret sources and methods to collect intelligence information, americans expect that these agencies will at all times operate within the boundaries of publicly understood law. now, i have had the honor, mr. president, to serve on the intelligence community now for over a decade. i don't take a back seat to anyone when it comes to the importance of protecting genuine , sensitive details about the work being done in the intelligence community, particularly their sources and metho
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:45am EST
. >> the commander-in-chief is in charge but these 1000 miles away in washington. >> but it could work when the army commander and the naval commander of the particular operations cooperative with each other. that became -- commander of the western flotilla and to general u.s. grant in the winter of 1862 because they work together to capture fort henry, for donaldson, and the tributaries of the mississippi river. then foot was on his own for a while working with john pope, and that worked out pretty well, too. when they captured the island in april 1862. part of this sequence of union successes in the spring of 1862 which then did come to an end, so if there is informal cooperation between the two of them it works pretty well. but as they see themselves as rivals, it's not going to work. >> look at halleck and grant in 1862. halleck is worrying about grant. >> give us a sense of the state of, the evolving state in terms of shifting and as 1861 most 1862 and sort of changes, radically in terms of enlistme enlistment. >> start with me? yeah, one of the things about the civil war, and i think it's part
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 9:00am EST
: washington, d.c, december 5, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for up to four hours. the reason for that is we've been on the defense bill for a considerable number of days, and people haven't been able to come and express their views on a number of different issues, so we're going to extend that morning business for a longer time thank normal. following morning business, about 2:00, we'll begin consideration of h.r. 6156, the russia trade bill. we hope to complete action on this that bill today. madam president, across the country, americans are lamenting that lack of progress in negotiations to avoid a massive tax increase on middle-class families -- and i really share that frustration. consider yesterday's failure, the disabilities convention at t
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 9:00am EST
. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 4, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider the disabilities trite. the time until noon will be equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees. at noon there will be a roll call vote on the resolution of advise and consent to the convention on rights of persons with disabilities. we don't do treaties often and there are requests from both --m senators on both sides of the aisle. i think the they're right, becae this is a treaty, the votes will take place from our desks today. everybody should be on notice. following the vote, mr. president, the senate will recess to allow for our weekly caucus meetings. additional votes in resolution
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)